About the American Library in Paris Book Award

The Book Award was launched in 2013 and carries a $5,000 prize, which is supported by generous funding from the Florence Gould Foundation. The past recipients of the prize reflect the diversity of intellectual and literary output that the Book Award seeks to recognize.

The Book Award follows a long tradition of showcasing and celebrating authors at the American Library. The Library was created in part as a memorial to a young American poet, Alan Seeger, who wrote the well-known poem “I Have a Rendezvous with Death” not long before he died in action in France in 1916. One of the Library’s founding trustees was Edith Wharton. Ernest Hemingway and Gertrude Stein, among many other writers of note, contributed reviews to the Library’s literary magazine, Ex Libris. Stephen Vincent Benét composed sections of John Brown’s Body at the Library. Authors of every generation have worked and spoken at the Library: Ford Madox Ford, Archibald MacLeish, Colette, Henry Miller, André Gide, Anaïs Nin, James Baldwin, Irwin Shaw, James Jones, and Mary McCarthy, to name a few from the past. As the Library approaches its centennial, it remains the pre-eminent center in Paris for evening talks by prominent authors, artists, and other public figures.

Latest news: The 2019 Book Award goes to Marc Weitzmann

The winner of the 2019 American Library in Paris Book Award is Marc Weitzmann, author of Hate: The Rising Tide of Anti-Semitism in France (and What It Means for Us).

Weitzmann accepted the award, and the $5,000 prize, at a reception at the George C. Marshall Center near the Place de la Concorde on Thursday 7 November 2019. Library Director Audrey Chapuis and Book Award Administrator Charles Trueheart announced the six titles on the shortlist and the screening committee’s five coups de coeur. The three members of the jury awarded the prize and presented their encomium.

Mr. Weitzmann, the Book Award’s first French winner, spoke about how Philip Roth pushed him to develop the series of articles he wrote for Tablet Magazine into a book-length work for an American audience. About writing in English, he said that “thinking in a foreign language gives you another understanding of your own country.” The American Library in Paris Book Award recognizes a work written originally in English that deepens and stimulates our understanding of France or the French.

Read the full 2019 Book Award Press Release here. A photo gallery of the 2019 Book Award ceremony can be viewed on the Library’s Flickr page.

Marc Weitzmann blends memoir, scholarship and reportage to create a powerful nonfiction study of anti-Semitism in France today. In prose that’s by turns expansive and taut, he reframes a story we thought we knew, and offers glimmers of clarity into what’s happening in France and beyond. Improbably, by doing so, he offers something like hope.

From the jury’s citation

The 2019 Book Award Shortlist

On 16 July 2019, six titles were selected as finalists for the 2019 American Library in Paris Book Award: a novel set in Occupied France, a culinary primer on French history, an intellectual biography of Diderot, a poetic reimagining of the life of Joan of Arc, a polemic on anti-Semitism in France, and a fictional account of Mme. Tussaud’s early years.

Edward Carey. Little: A Novel (Riverhead Books US / Gallic Books UK)

Andrew S. Curran. Diderot and the Art of Thinking Freely (Other Press)

David Elliott. Voices: The Final Hours of Joan of Arc (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Stéphane Hénaut and Jeni Mitchell. A Bite-Sized History of France: Gastronomic Tales of Revolution, War, and Enlightenment (The New Press)

Julie Orringer. The Flight Portfolio: A Novel (Alfred A. Knopf)

Marc Weitzmann. Hate: The Rising Tide of Anti-Semitism in France (and What it Means for Us) (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

The 2019 Book Award Submissions

This is the seventh year of the American Library in Paris Book Award, recognizing the most distinguished books of the year, in English, about France. In this cycle, eighty-two titles were submitted by authors, publishers, and others for consideration.

The Book Award, which carries a $5,000 prize, is supported by generous funding from the Florence Gould Foundation. A Paris-based screening committee selected six finalists for the 2019 prize. The winning title will be chosen by this year’s independent jury: Alice Kaplan, professor of French at Yale University and author of seven books, including Looking for the Stranger: Albert Camus and the Life of a Literary Classic; New York Times Magazine contributing writer Thomas Chatterton Williams, author of Losing My Cool: Love, Literature, and a Black Man’s Escape from the Crowd and Self-Portrait in Black and White: Unlearning Race; and Pamela Druckerman, Paris-based New York Times columnist and author of There Are No Grown-Ups: A Midlife Coming-of-Age Story and four other books.

The Book Award laureate will be announced in the presence of the winning author and Library supporters at an invitation-only ceremony in Paris on 7 November 2019. If you are interested in becoming a patron of the Book Award ceremony, or have questions about the prize, please write the Book Award administrator, Charles Trueheart, at bookaward@americanlibraryinparis.org.

All the submissions for the 2019 Book Award are in the Library’s circulating collection and are available for checkout by members.

Previous Years

The 2018 Book Award: Julian Jackson and A Certain Idea of France

Photo credit: Krystal Kenney

The jurors were impressed by Julian Jackson’s magnificent biography of the strangest and most significant figure to mark French history in the twentieth century. A Certain Idea of France is a triumph of scholarship and thoughtfulness, and an important contribution to France’s understanding of itself. Jackson’s book is a masterpiece of historical writing that provides an intimate portrait of an unusual man, a profound reflection on the history of France, and a gripping, stylish narrative at the same time. Jackson accepted the award, and the $5,000 prize, at a reception at the George C. Marshall Center near the Place de la Concorde on Thursday 8 November 2018. Library Director Audrey Chapuis and Book Award Administrator Charles Trueheart presented the award.

In his remarks, Jackson discussed the challenges of writing about de Gaulle, a “weird” and “extraordinarily pragmatic person,” when there are “no new facts.” Jackson told the assembled guests he tried to convey de Gaulle’s sense of history and understanding of the world, and noted “that wisdom that comes from history—the deep understanding of history—is something we miss today.”

The jury for the 2018 award included Diane Johnson, novelist, essayist, critic, and chairman of the Library’s Writers Council; David Bellos, Princeton professor, translator, and author of the winning 2017 title, The Novel of the Century; and Pierre Assouline, biographer, novelist, critic, and editor of larepubliquedeslivres.com.

The shortlist was announced in September 2018:

Adam Begley. The Great Nadar: The Man Behind the Camera (Tim Duggan Books)
Julian Jackson. A Certain Idea of France: The Life of Charles de Gaulle (Allen Lane UK / Harvard University Press US)
Bijan Omrani. Caesar’s Footprints: A Cultural Excursion to Ancient France: Journeys Through Roman Gaul (Pegasus Books US / Head of Zeus UK)
Rupert Thomson. Never Anyone But You (Corsair UK / Other Press US)
Caroline Weber. Proust’s Duchess: How Three Celebrated Women Captured the Imagination of Fin-de-Siècle Paris (Alfred A. Knopf)

Read the full 2018 Book Award Press Release here. A photo gallery of the ceremony can be viewed on the Library’s Flickr. Here is the complete list of all seventy-six submissions for the 2018 Book Award.

The 2017 Book Award: David Bellos and The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventures of Les Misérables

Photo credit: Krystal Kenney

Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables is one of the most popular novels of all time. Biographer David Bellos recounts the fascinating story of the decades-long creation of this masterwork in his just-published book, The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventures of Les Misérables. The screeners and jury of the 2017 Book Award were unanimous. Bellos’s account takes the prize. Bellos accepted the Award, and the $5,000 prize, at the glittering reception at the George C. Marshall Center near the Place de la Concorde on Friday 3 November 2017. The Library’s Writers Council chairwoman and Parisian literary fixture Diane Johnson presented the award.

In his remarks, Bellos stressed the immortal nature of this great work of literature, in continuous print for over 150 years and translated into dozens of languages. According to Bellos, Victor Hugo’s underlying themes of redemption, love, and struggle against poverty remain every bit as relevant today as they were in the 1860s, perhaps more so. 

The jury for the 2017 award included New Yorker staff writer Adam Gopnik, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Stacy Schiff, and former director of la Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Bruno Racine.

The shortlist was announced in July 2017:

David Bellos. The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables (Particular Books UK / Farrar, Straus and Giroux US)
Adam Gidwitz. The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog (Dutton Children’s Books)
Ross King. Mad Enchantment: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies (Bloomsbury)
David McAninch. Duck Season: Eating, Drinking, and Other Misadventures in Gascony—France’s Last Best Place (Harper)
Nadja Spiegelman. I’m Supposed to Protect You from All This: A memoir (Riverhead Books)
Susan Suleiman. The Némirovsky Question: The Life, Death, and Legacy of a Jewish Writer in Twentieth-Century France (Yale University Press)

Here is the 2017 Book Award Press Release in English and French. A photo gallery of the 2017 Book Award ceremony can found on the Library Flickr. Here is the complete list of the seventy-six submissions for the 2017 Book Award.

The 2016 Book Award: Ethan Katz and The Burdens of Brotherhood: Jews and Muslims from North Africa to France

Photo by Krystal Kenney

Ethan B. Katz’s book about the relations between Jews and Muslims of North African descent living in France was awarded the fourth annual Book Award Thursday 3 November at a ceremony in Paris. Diane Johnson, chairman of the Library’s Writers Council, announced the choice of The Burdens of Brotherhood: Jews and Muslims from North Africa to France, published by Harvard University Press, in the presence of Katz, an associate professor at the University of Cincinnati, who went on to speak of his book and its subject. (Full transcript of Ethan B. Katz’s remarks.)

The jury stated: “The book’s highly original and fresh earlier chapters explore a common Maghrebi culture in which Jews and Muslims had good neighborly relations, and in which their identities were set not only by religion but also by profession, education, tastes in food and music, and many other characteristics. Katz’s powerful analysis about how identities are shaped will surely prove to be influential far beyond the subject of Jews and Muslims in France.”

The jury for the 2016 award included Laura Auricchio, the chair, whose biography The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered, won the 2015 award; British novelist Robert Harris, whose An Officer and a Spy, about the Dreyfus affair, won the 2014 award; and Robert O. Paxton, the historian and leading American scholar on Nazi Occupation in France.

The shortlist was announced on 11 July 2016:

Jo Baker. A Country Road, A Tree: A Novel (Knopf)
Sarah Bakewell. At the Existentialist Café: Freedom, Being, and Apricot Cocktails (Other Press)
Julie Barlow and Jean-Benoît Nadeau. The Bonjour Effect: The Secret Codes of French Conversation Revealed (St. Martin’s Press US / Duckworth Publishers UK)
David Drake. Paris at War: 1939-1944 (Harvard University Press)
Ethan B. Katz. The Burdens of Brotherhood: Jews and Muslims from North Africa to France (Harvard University Press)
Luc Sante. The Other Paris (Farrar, Straus and Giroux US / Faber & Faber UK)

View photos of the ceremony on the Library Flickr. Here is the 2016 Book Award Press Release in English. Here is the complete list of the fifty-nine submissions for the 2016 Book Award.

The 2015 Book Award: Laura Auricchio and The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered

Laura Auricchio’s biography of the Marquis de Lafayette was awarded the third annual American Library in Paris Book Award Friday 6 November at a ceremony in Paris. Laura Furman, chairman of the jury, announced the choice of The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered, published by Knopf, in the presence of Auricchio, an art historian and dean at the New School in New York, who went on to speak of her book and its subject.

Diane Johnson, chairman of the Library’s Writers Council, presented Auricchio with a custom-bound copy of her book.

The jury for the 2015 award included Laura Furman, the chair, editor of the O. Henry Prize Stories since 2002; novelist and biographer Lily Tuck, winner of the National Book Award in Fiction; and Fredrik Logevall, author of Embers of War, winner of the first American Library in Paris Book Award in 2013.

The shortlist was announced on 14 July 2015:

Laura Auricchio. The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered (Knopf)
Nancy L. Green. The Other Americans in Paris: Businessmen, Countesses, Wayward Youth 1880-1941 (University of Chicago Press)
Richard C. Keller. Fatal Isolation: The Devastating Paris Heat Wave of 2003 (University of Chicago Press)
Sue Roe. In Montmartre: Picasso, Matisse, and Modernism in Paris, 1900-1910 (Fig Tree UK / Penguin Press US)
Ronald Rosbottom. When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation 1940-1944 (Little, Brown US / John Murray UK)

Here is the complete list of the 102 submissions for the 2015 Book Award and the 2015 Book Award Press Release in English. View photos of the event on the Library Flickr.

The 2014 Book Award: Robert Harris and An Officer and a Spy

The second annual American Library in Paris Book Award was presented Monday 3 November 2014 to Robert Harris for his historical novel An Officer and a Spy. Alice Kaplan, chairman of the jury, revealed the honored book to 100 guests at a ceremony within the gilded walls of the George C. Marshall Center in the Hôtel de Talleyrand. The other two jurors were Pierre Assouline and Sebastian Faulks. The novel, published by Random House and Hutchinson in the UK, recounts the conspiracy at the heart of the Dreyfus affair and centers on French army officer Georges Picquart, who discovered that Dreyfus was innocent.

In his remarks, Harris spoke of realizing the approach needed to write the novel: “I can honestly say that the writing of the book was an absolute joy from beginning to end. The dirty little secret of writing, as E.L. Doctorow once said, is that you have to find the voice. And the moment I realized that I should write this as Georges Picquart’s memoir, I had the voice. And thereafter, history gave me all the characters and all the story.” Harris went on to say that he was drawn to Picquart “because he seemed to me a truly interesting French hero. He could only be French. if the Dreyfus affair reflects discredit upon France, the fact and the behavior of Picquart reflects enormous credit.”

The jury for the 2014 award included authors Alice Kaplan, Sebastian Faulks, and Pierre Assouline.

The shortlist was announced in July 2014:

Jonathan Beckman. How to Ruin a Queen: Marie Antoinette, the Stolen Diamonds and the Scandal that Shook the French Throne (John Murray UK / Da Capo Press US)
Frederick Brown. The Embrace of Unreason: France 1914-1940 (Knopf)
Sean B. Carroll. Brave Genius: A Scientist, a Philosopher, and their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize (Crown)
Philip Dwyer. Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power 1799-1815 (Bloomsbury UK / Yale University Press US)
Robert Harris. An Officer and a Spy (Hutchinson US / Arrow UK)
Francine Prose. Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932 (HarperCollins US)

View photos of the ceremony on the Library Flickr. Here is the 2014 Book Award Press Release in English. Here is the complete list of the ninety-five submissions for the 2014 Book Award.

The 2013 Book Award: Fredrik Logevall and Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam

The first annual American Library in Paris Book Award was given to Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam, by Fredrik Logevall. At a lovely ceremony held in the august, history-filled halls of the George C. Marshall Center overlooking the Place de la Concorde, guests talked over champagne, wine and hors d’oeuvres. Trustees, Library donors, friends of the Library, journalists, the original screening committee as well as several of the authors of the 45 books originally submitted for the award, listened as director Charles Trueheart introduced jury member Diane Johnson to announce the winning book. Johnson, Adam Gopnik and Julian Barnes had selected the winner from the five-book shortlist.

Receiving the prize and the accompanying $5,000 check, the erudite, plain-spoken Logevall discussed of the tragedy that was France’s war in Indochina, which led not to peace but to continuing tragedy as the United States directly engaged in its own war as the French departed. Logevall ended with a quote from Bernard Fall, a significant figure in his book: “Americans were dreaming different dreams than the French, but walking in the same footsteps.”

The jury for the 2013 award was composed of authors Julian Barnes, Adam Gopnik, and Diane Johnson.

The shortlist was announced on 17 July 2013:

Simon van Booy. The Illusion of Separateness: A Novel (Harper US / Oneworld Publications UK)
Alex Danchev. Cezanne: A Life (Pantheon US / Profile Books Ltd UK)
Fredrik Logevall. Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam (Random House US / Presidio Press UK)
Tom Reiss. The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Crown US / Harvill Secker UK)
Marilyn Yalom. How the French Invented Love: Nine Hundred Years of Passion and Romance (Harper)

Photos of the ceremony can be viewed on the Library Flickr. Here is the 2013 Book Award Press Release in English. Here is the complete list of the forty-five submissions for the 2013 Book Award.

Past Winners at a Glance

2019: Hate: The Rising Tide of Anti-Semitism in France (and What It Means for Us) by Marc Weitzmann

2018: A Certain Idea of France: The Life of Charles de Gaulle by Julian Jackson

2017: The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables by David Bellos

2016: The Burdens of Brotherhood: Jews and Muslims from North Africa to France by Ethan B. Katz

2015: The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered by Laura Auricchio

2014: An Officer and a Spy by Robert Harris

2013: Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam by Fredrik Logevall

Administration

The Award is administered by the American Library in Paris and is overseen by its Writers Council. The jury for the 2019 award included Alice Kaplan, professor of French at Yale University and author of seven books, including Looking for the Stranger: Albert Camus and the Life of a Literary Classic; New York Times Magazine contributing writer Thomas Chatterton Williams, author of Losing My Cool: Love, Literature, and a Black Man’s Escape from the Crowd and Self-Portrait in Black and White: Unlearning Race; and Pamela Druckerman, Paris-based New York Times columnist and author of There Are No Grown-Ups: A Midlife Coming-of-Age Story and four other books.

For a list of frequently asked questions, please check The American Library in Paris Book Award FAQs.

Eligibility

  • Submissions for the 2020 Award opened on 1 November 2019.
  • Any book-length prose fiction or nonfiction work, originally written in English, about France or the French, will be considered by a committee of Award screeners. Nominated books must be scheduled for publication between 1 July 2019 and 30 June 2020.
  • Anyone – author, publisher, agent, reader — may submit books for this award.
  • Books published exclusively in electronic form or online are not eligible.
  • A reprint of a book first published in another year is not eligible.
  • Books by members of the Writers Council or screening committee are not eligible for the Award.
  • The decision of the jury is final and no correspondence will be entered into regarding the judging process.

As soon as you know you would like to submit a book, please notify Orlene McMahon at bookaward@americanlibraryinparis.org with the title of the book(s) and the estimated date the Library will receive the book(s). All submitted books must be postmarked and mailed to the American Library in Paris no later than 1 May 2020. Early submissions are encouraged.

Submission Process

All submission materials for the 2020 Book Award must be received by 1 May 2020.

  • STEP ONE – Complete the online submission form. A separate form must be submitted for each title.
  • STEP TWO – Submit the entry fee of €50.00 or $60.00. A separate entry fee must be submitted for each title. We accept payments by check in euros or U.S. dollars, by credit card via Paybox (see link below), or via wire transfer.

Entry Fee Payment

Pay Online via Paybox

Please make checks payable to The American Library in Paris and send them to the address below. Contact Orlene McMahon at bookaward@americanlibraryinparis.org to pay via wire transfer.

  • STEP THREE – Send us four (4) copies of each submitted book. Proof or reviewer’s copies are acceptable as long as the book’s publication date will fall on or before 30 June 2020 and must be replaced by finished copies at the time of publication.

The American Library in Paris Book Award
c/o The American Library in Paris
10, rue du Général Camou
75007 Paris
FRANCE

Phone number, if needed by shipper:  +33 1 53 59 12 60

If you choose to send books via FedEx, UPS, DHL, or another shipping company, please send an e-mail to bookaward@americanlibraryinparis.org to provide a tracking number.

Timeline

1 November 2019Submissions open
1 May 2020Submissions close
15 July 2020Shortlist announced
November 2020Winner announced at award ceremony in Paris

Books received will not be returned and become property of the American Library in Paris. The American Library in Paris Book Award is made possible by a generous gift from the Florence Gould Foundation.