Giving to the Library

The regular support of members and friends of the Library is essential in ensuring its health and vitality. Thanks to gifts, grants, and other generous contributions, the Library is celebrating almost 100 years of service in Paris. Significant fundraising efforts during the year include our Fall and Spring appeals, as well as our annual Gala. Our ability to continue to thrive depends wholly on the support received from these efforts, and others like them.

2018 Spring Appeal

Make a donation – your help is vital to us
Read about our 2018 Spring Appeal, learn all about the great things happening at the Library, and how we simply could not do all of these things without donations from people like you. Download and complete our mail-in Donation Card and send it together with your contribution to The American Library in Paris at 10, rue du Général Camou, 75007 Paris, FRANCE.

If you have any inquiries, please contact Audrey Chapuis, assistant director, at chapuis@americanlibraryinparis.org.

For more information about where your contributions go, view the Library’s Annual Report.

The American Library in Paris is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and an organisme d’intérêt général for French tax purposes. All contributions are tax-deductible to the full extent allowed by law and will be acknowledged with a tax receipt.

The importance of the Library

A few of our guests share their thoughts about the American Library in Paris…

Ta-Nehisi Coates, national correspondent of The Atlantic and author of The Beautiful Struggle, talks about his experience at the American Library in Paris:

“The American Library was kind enough to award me a Visiting Fellowship in January of 2015 where I was able to work out part of the story in my book focusing on France, and Paris specifically. It’s no exaggeration to say that this book began at the American Library in Paris and was finished at the American Library in Paris, which I first visited in 2013 to give a talk.

The Library was an invaluable resource to me and I hope that people of good will continue to support it so that it may remain a valuable resource to other writers and readers.”

An enthusiastic testimonial from humorist, author, and syndicated columnist Dave Barry:

“The American Library in Paris is a treasure — a vibrant outpost of American literary culture, and a warm and welcoming gathering place. My co-author Ridley Pearson and I gave a talk at the Library about our Starcatchers series, and we were thrilled by the turnout, as well as the audience’s enthusiasm and interest.

“The Library is a real community, made up of people of all nationalities and ages drawn together by a love of reading, and learning, and fun. It does a fine job of representing what’s good about America, and it deserves your support.”

Speaking in the reading room in February, Sebastian Faulks took a moment to recall his early discovery of the Library:

“As a young student alone in Paris 35 years ago, learning to speak French, I recall visiting a large librairie in the Boulevard Saint-Michel. I thought how superior the French library system was to the English in having nothing but new books for readers to borrow.

“I wasn’t sure what the limit was, but risked five at the checkout desk. I was presented with a bill so large that I couldn’t eat lunch for ten days, but was too shy to quibble. My French language studies had not got as far as distinguishing between librairie (bookshop) and bibliothèque (lending library).

“Thank goodness for the American Library on rue du Général Camou, which became my Monday destination for many weeks afterwards: Métro to Alma Marceau, then Pont de l’Alma across the Seine and a brisk walk up Avenue Rapp, where a café sold a camembert sandwich — sans beurre — for a full ten centimes less than my local bar in place des Acacias. From the American Library I had my first experience of Henry James, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Melville; and, as a reward for finishing Moby-Dick, To Kill a Mockingbird.”

In a kind of bookend to that memory, a scene in Faulks’s latest novel, Where My Heart Used to Beat, is set in the American Library.

Thank you for your support!